Patient Education:

Articles

Abscess

An abscess is a limited area of pus formed as a result of a bacterial infection. The body's immune system reacts to the infection, and sends white blood cells to the area to try to get rid of the bacteria. Pus is a mixture of live and dead white blood cells, enzymes and parts of destroyed cells and tissues. When there is no way for pus to drain, it forms an abscess.

All About Cavities

To understand what happens when your teeth decay, it's helpful to know what's in your mouth naturally.

Apicoectomy

Your teeth are held in place by roots that extend into your jawbone. Front teeth usually have one root. Other teeth, such as your premolars and molars, have two or more roots. The tip of each root is called the apex. Nerves and blood vessels enter the tooth through the apex, travel through a canal inside the root, and into the pulp chamber, which is inside the crown (the part of the tooth visible in the mouth).

Are There Other Alternatives For Improving My Smile?

Not everyone is a candidate for whitening. Bleaching is not recommended if you have tooth-coloured fillings, crowns, caps or bonding in your front teeth — the bleach will not change the colour of these materials, making them stand out in your newly whitened smile. In these cases, you may want to investigate other options, like veneers or bonding.

Baby Leaflet

A guide to dental health for your baby and the family. As parents of young children there will be many calls on your time, but the simple dental advice offered in this booklet will provide important health gains for your children.

Bad Breath (Halitosis)

What is halitosis? Halitosis simply means bad breath, a problem that many people experience at one time or another. It is estimated that 40 percent of the population suffers from chronic halitosis at some time.

Bad Breath and Its Relationship to Oral Systemic Diseases

Bad Breath and Its Relationship to Oral Systemic Diseases

Bad Breath, Do you have it? You may not know you do

Avoiding a few common foods and bad habits in this list could help end your bad breath.

Better Oral Health May Mean Better Overall Health

Improper oral care may lead to plaque buildup and plaque formation may lead to gingivitis, which in some patients may progress to periodontitis, a more severe form of gum disease.

Bringing Teeth into Alignment with Orthodontic Treatment

Understand how teeth become crooked and your corrective options.

Bruxism (Teeth Grinding)

Bruxism is clenching or grinding your teeth, often without being aware that your are doing it. In the United States, bruxism affects an estimated 30 to 40 million children and adults.

Bruxism, Are you experiencing it?

Understanding tooth grinding - stress can play a large role in whether or not bruxism, or tooth grinding, affects you.

Bruxism: Signs and Symptoms

If you find yourself waking up with sore jaw muscles or a headache, you may be suffering from bruxism — the grinding and clenching of teeth. Bruxism can cause teeth to become painful or loose, and sometimes parts of the teeth are literally ground away. Eventually, bruxism can destroy the surrounding bone and gum tissue. It can also lead to problems involving the jaw joint, such as temporomandibular joint syndrome (TMJ).

Burning Mouth Syndrome

Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a complex, vexing condition in which a burning pain occurs that may involve your tongue, lips or widespread areas of your whole mouth, without any obvious reason.

Can Medications Have An Effect On My Oral Health?

Yes, medications can have oral side effects – dry mouth being the most common. Be sure to tell your dentist about any medications that you're taking, even medicines that you purchase without a prescription.

Canker Sores (Aphthous Stomatitis Or Recurrent Mouth Ulcers)

This disease causes painful, round ulcers to develop on the linings of the cheeks and lips, the tongue or the base of the gums. The tendency to develop these ulcers is inherited. Ulcers also can be associated with other diseases, particularly connective tissue diseases such as lupus or Behçet's syndrome, which cause symptoms on the eyes and genitals as well as the mouth. There can be one or many ulcers at the same time, and they are recurrent, which means they keep returning. Multiple ulcers are scattered across the lining of the mouth, not clustered. Most people get one to three of these lesions at each episode, but a small number of people get more than a dozen ulcers at a time.

Caries Information

Dental caries, or tooth decay, is the formation of cavities in the teeth by the action of bacteria. The causes of caries are plaque bacteria, dietary sugars, exposure to acid attack and susceptible tooth surfaces.

Caries Poster

Follow these four easy steps to make sure your child keeps smiling.

Cheilosis/Cheilitis

Cheilosis (also called cheilitis) is a painful inflammation and cracking of the corners of the mouth. It sometimes occurs on only one side of the mouth, but usually involves both sides. This disorder occurs most frequently in people with ill-fitting dentures that fail to adequately separate the upper and lower jaws. People with habits that irritate the corners of the mouth, like licking or rubbing those areas, also are more likely to develop cheilosis. Moisture gathers in skin folds at the corner of the mouth and provides a fertile environment for the formation of yeast (Candida) infections.

Choosing The Right Toothbrush

With so many shapes, sizes and styles of toothbrushes on the market, deciding which kind to buy can be confusing.

Cold Sores And Fever Blisters

Cold sores and fever blisters are caused by the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a virus that passes from person to person by direct contact with infected skin or secretions, including saliva. The sores usually appear as clusters of tiny blisters on the lip. HSV-1 can cause similar, but smaller, blisters that rapidly become ulcers inside the mouth on the gums and palate (roof of the mouth).

Colgate Total Triclosan

Colgate Total® Toothpaste the #1 Trusted Choice of Dental Professionals

Cracked Tooth Syndrome

Unlike teeth with obvious fractures, teeth with cracked tooth syndrome usually have fractures that are too small to be seen on X-rays. Sometimes the fracture is below the gum line, making it even more difficult to identify.

Debridement

Debridement is the removal of excessive amounts of plaque and tartar from your teeth.

Dental Caries (Cavities)

Dental caries is the medical term for tooth decay or cavities. It is caused by acid erosion of tooth enamel. Many different types of germs normally live in the human mouth. They accumulate (along with saliva, food particles and other natural substances) on the surface of the teeth in a sticky film called plaque. Plaque forms especially easily in cracks, pits or fissures in the back teeth; between teeth; around dental fillings or bridgework; and near the gum line. Some of the plaque germs convert sugar and carbohydrates (starches) in the foods we eat into acids. These acids dissolve minerals in the surface of the tooth, forming microscopic pits or erosions that get larger over time.

Dental Emergencies:Introduction

If you have a toothache, take an appropriate painkiller and see the dentist as soon as possible. If there is an object wedged between teeth, try to remove the object with dental floss, guiding the floss carefully to prevent cutting gums. If you can't remove the object, see a dentist.

Dental Trauma

Prevent your child from losing their smile. If an adult tooth is knocked out, follow these steps.

Developing Teeth: Moving From Primary To Permanent

Because there are more permanent teeth than primary teeth, the permanent premolars come in behind the primary molars. Permanent molars emerge into an open space. The jaw lengthens as a child grows to create space for these permanent molars.

Diabetes and Oral Health

During the past 10 years, much research has been undertaken on the link between diabetes and periodontal disease. Periodontal disease is the sixth leading complication of diabetes. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease, with a higher rate of more severe levels of bone loss and gum infection.

Diastemas and Treatment Options

Diastema is the medical term for spaces between teeth. Though typically harmless, many treatment options exist to correct the condition.

Dislocation of the Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ)

The temporomandibular joint (TMJ), located just in front of the lower part of the ear, allows the lower jaw to move. The TMJ is a ball-and-socket joint, just like the hip or shoulder. When the mouth opens wide, the ball (called the condyle) comes out of the socket and moves forward, going back into place when the mouth closes. TMJ becomes dislocated when the condyle moves too far and gets stuck in front of a bony prominence called the articular eminence. The condyle can't move back into place. This happens most often when the ligaments that normally keep the condyle in place are somewhat loose, allowing the condyle to move beyond the articular eminence. The surrounding muscles often go into spasm and hold the condyle in the dislocated position.

Family Guide to Oral Health

By following the information in this guide, you and your family can have healthy teeth and gums to last a lifetime. As a parent, you can work with your children to help them understand why good oral care is important — and show them how to do it right!

Fixed Brace

When caring for your fixed brace, clean your teeth and gums with a small headed toothbrush.

Fluorosis

Your permanent teeth form under your gums in the jawbone during early childhood. Except for your wisdom teeth, the crowns (the part you see in the mouth) of all of the permanent teeth fully form by the time you are about 8 years old. If you consume too much fluoride as a young child, the extra fluoride can disrupt the formation of the enamel (outer part) of your permanent teeth and lead to fluorosis, which varies from minor discoloration to surface irregularities of the teeth. The extra fluoride does not affect other parts of the tooth. Once your teeth have erupted into your mouth, they are not susceptible to fluorosis.

Gingival Flap Surgery

Gingival flap surgery is a procedure in which the gums are separated from the teeth and folded back temporarily to allow a dentist to reach the root of the tooth and the bone.

Gingivitis

People with gingivitis have inflamed gum tissue around their teeth, caused by bacteria found in dental plaque. Normal, healthy gums should be firmly attached to the teeth and underlying bone. They are pale pink in light-skinned people and brown, gray or mottled in people with darker complexions. If you have gingivitis, your gums are inflamed, red and swollen. They will bleed easily and may be tender. Mild gingivitis causes little pain and may be overlooked. If left unchecked, however, it can become severe. In some people, gingivitis progresses to periodontitis, which can lead to tooth loss.

History Of Toothbrushes And Toothpastes

Toothbrushing tools date back to 3500-3000 BC when the Babylonians and the Egyptians made a brush by fraying the end of a twig. Tombs of the ancient Egyptians have been found containing toothsticks alongside their owners. Around 1600BC, the Chinese developed "chewing sticks" which were made from aromatic tree twigs to freshen breath.

How Do I Care for My Infant's Teeth?

Good oral care starts from the beginning of your child's life. Even before his or her first teeth emerge, certain factors can affect their future appearance and health. For instance, tetracycline, a common antibiotic, can cause tooth discoloration. For this reason, they should not be used by nursing mothers or by expectant mothers in the last half of pregnancy.

How Do I Care for My Toddler's Teeth?

Passing on good oral habits to your child is one of the most important health lessons you can teach them. This means helping him or her brush twice a day, limiting between-meal sweet snacks and seeing your dentist regularly.

How To Brush – Teeth Brushing Techniques

Proper brushing takes at least two minutes – that's right, 120 seconds! Most adults do not come close to brushing that long. To get a feel for the time involved, try using a stopwatch. To properly brush your teeth, use short, gentle strokes, paying extra attention to the gumline, hard-to-reach back teeth and areas around fillings, crowns or other restoration.

How To Floss – Flossing Tips

Proper flossing removes plaque and food particles in places where a toothbrush cannot easily reach – under the gumline and between your teeth. Because plaque build-up can lead to tooth decay and gum disease, daily flossing is highly recommended.

Illustrations: How A Tooth Decays

Enamel is the hard outer crystal-like layer. Dentin is the softer layer beneath the enamel. The pulp chamber contains nerves and blood vessels and is considered the living part of the tooth.

Importance of Childhood Oral Hygiene & the Role of Parents

The foundation for healthy permanent teeth in children and teenagers is laid during the first years of life. Poor diet, poor habits of food intake and inadequate toothbrushing habits during the first 2 years of life have been shown in several studies to be related to tooth decay in children. The development of caries in primary teeth further increases the risk of developing caries in new permanent teeth.

Important Reasons for Mouth Guards

Learn to protect your mouth from the common and often times severe dental injuries that can occur during sports.

Improving My Smile (Tooth Whitening and Bonding)

Some people are born with teeth that are more yellow than others. Others have teeth that yellow with age. Your natural tooth colour can also be affected by many factors.

Injured Tooth: What Should I Do?

As with any trauma to the mouth, you should consult with your dentist immediately to determine if treatment is required.

Is It Your Jaw? A Symptoms Checklist For TMD

Do you notice clicking or popping when you open your mouth? Is it difficult or painful to open your mouth? Does your jaw occasionally lock, so it is stuck open or closed? If so, you should see your dentist for a consultation and examination. You may have a temporomandibular disorder (TMD). These disorders include problems of the chewing muscles, the jaw joint (called the temporomandibular joint or TMJ), or both.

Keys to Controlling Bad Breath

Treat bad breath with these simple tips and learn how to prevent future occurrences.

Kid's Brushing Chart

Help your child learn good brushing habits with the Colgate Smiles brushing chart.

Lodged Foreign Bodies

Small pieces of food ? especially things like popcorn hulls ? can get under your gums. If these pieces aren't removed, the area can get irritated, and even infected.

Lost Filling Or Crown

Fillings, which are materials used to fill cavities in the teeth, and crowns, which slip over and cover the tops of damaged teeth, sometimes loosen and fall out. This is rarely an emergency, but it can be painful because the exposed tooth tissue is often sensitive to pressure, air or hot and cold temperatures. In some cases, a filling or crown may come loose because decay has developed underneath it. The decay can cause the tooth to change shape and as a result, the crown of filling no longer fits the tooth properly.

Mouth Guards and Maintenance

Following these maintenance techniques will keep the integrity of your mouth guard intact and your mouth safer.

Mouth-Healthy Eating

If you want to prevent cavities, how often you eat can be just as important as what you eat. That's because food affects your teeth and mouth long after you swallow. Eating cookies with dinner will do less harm to your teeth than eating them in the middle of the afternoon as a separate snack. Of course, overall poor nutrition can contribute to periodontal (gum) disease and can have other long-term effects on your mouth. Learning how food affects your oral health ? long-term and short-term ? is the first step toward mouth-healthy eating.

New Treatments For Cold Sores

If you suffer from cold sores, you are not alone. Nearly 70% of Americans ages 12 and older test positive for herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), the virus that causes cold sores. At least 20% of patients with HSV experience recurring cold sores.

Newer Technologies Find Tooth Decay Early

Sometimes it's all too obvious that you have tooth decay: You're in pain or you can see a dark spot on your tooth. But in other cases, you may not even know there's a problem until you see your dentist.

Nutrition

Proper nutrition means eating a balanced diet so your body can get the nutrients needed for good health. Every day, your body renews itself, building new muscle, bone, skin and blood. The foods you eat provide the building blocks for these new tissues. If your diet is low in the nutrients your body needs, your mouth may have a more difficult time resisting infection.

Oral First Aid At Home

You probably have a first aid kit in your home to handle life's minor bumps and bruises. But are you prepared for a dental emergency?

Oral Health & Your Heart

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a disease involving the heart and blood vessels. It's the No. 1 cause of death and disability in the United States today, with almost 700,000 Americans dying of heart disease each year. That represents almost 29% of all deaths in the United States.

Oral Health And Overall Health: Why A Healthy Mouth Is Good For Your Body

Taking good care of your mouth, teeth and gums is a worthy goal in and of itself. Good oral and dental hygiene can help prevent bad breath, tooth decay and gum disease—and can help you keep your teeth as you get older.

Oral Health for Children

Teaching your child proper oral care at a young age is an investment in his or her health that will pay lifelong dividends. You can start by setting an example; taking good care of your own teeth sends a message that oral health is something to be valued. And anything that makes taking care of teeth fun, like brushing along with your child or letting them choose their own toothbrush, encourages proper oral care.

Oral Malodor: You Don't Have To Be Embarrassed Anymore

Oral malodor, also known as halitosis and commonly referred to as bad breath, is an embarrassing odor that emerges from the mouth and is easily detected by others. Surprisingly, some people with bad breath might not even know they have a problem. A primary source for oral malodor is the tongue, home to germs stored inside all of its grooves and cracks. When particles of food aren't completely removed from the mouth, they collect bacteria on the tongue and around the gums. These germs feed on the food and protein material in the mouth, as well as their byproducts. A possible result–bad breath.

Partially Dislodged (Extruded) Tooth

When a tooth is partially loosened or dislodged from its socket, dentists call it an extruded tooth. As long as the nerve and blood vessels remain intact, an extruded tooth may be saved without root-canal treatment, depending on how displaced it is.

Pericoronitis

Wisdom teeth do not always emerge (erupt) into the mouth properly because there may not be enough room in the mouth for them to fit. Sometimes, a part of the tooth may remain covered by a flap of gum. Food particles and germs can get trapped under this flap and cause a mild irritation, a low-grade infection called pericoronitis and swelling. This usually happens with the lower wisdom teeth.

Pericoronitis (Infection Near Wisdom Tooth)

Your wisdom teeth (third molars) usually start to erupt (enter your mouth) during late adolescence. Sometimes, there's not enough room for them, and they come in partially or not at all. This condition can lead to pericoronitis, inflammation of the tissue surrounding the tooth. When only part of the tooth has erupted into the mouth, it can create a flap of gum tissue that easily holds food particles and debris and is a hotbed for germs. Pericoronitis also can occur around a wisdom tooth that has not erupted at all and is still under the gums.

Periodontal Disease and Cardiovascular Disease

Recent studies show there may be a relationship between the health of your mouth and the health of your body, including periodontitis and cardiovascular disease.

Periodontal Disease and Diabetes

Periodontitis is often associated with diabetes and may be one of the chronic complications associated with the disease.

Periodontal Disease and Obesity

New research suggests that there is a link between periodontal disease and obesity.

Periodontal Disease: Causes and Prevention

Periodontitis is a term used to describe a group of conditions that involves inflammation of the gums and other structures that support the teeth. Periodontitis is caused by germs found in dental plaque and often, but not always, starts as gingivitis.

Periodontal Disease: What You Don't Know Can Hurt You

It is estimated that 35.7 million Americans are living with a bacterial infection of the gums known as periodontal disease. This infection attacks the tissue that keeps your teeth attached to your gums.

Periodontitis

Early-stage periodontal disease (gingivitis) is seldom painful and causes relatively minor signs, such as red, swollen and bleeding gums. But untreated gingivitis can progress to periodontitis, a serious infection that destroys the soft tissue and bone that support your teeth, and eventually may cause tooth loss.

Plaque — What It Is And How To Get Rid Of It

People used to think that as you got older you naturally lost your teeth. We now know that’s not true. By following easy steps for keeping your teeth and gums healthy – plus seeing your dentist regularly — you can have your teeth for a lifetime!

Plaque and Periodontal Disease

Plaque is the film of bacteria which is constantly forming on all teeth. Plaque causes dental caries (tooth decay) and periodontal disease (gum disease).

Protecting Your Healthy Smile while Wearing Braces

While you are wearing braces, it is essential that you take care of your teeth and gums. This brochure explains why and how.

Safety Sheet

Dental injuries can often be prevented — especially if you know what to watch out for. These tips can help you do just that. Note the specific areas that you know may prove dangerous.

Scrotal Tongue

Scrotal tongue is a condition in which fissures develop in the tongue, making it look wrinkled. The condition also is called furrowed tongue, lingua fissurata, lingua plicata, lingua scrotalis, plicated tongue or grooved tongue. There can be many fissures or a single groove down the middle of the tongue with fissures branching off from it. Scrotal tongue affects between 1% to 5% of the population of the United States, but as much as 21% of people worldwide.

Sensitive Teeth

Many adults suffer from sensitive teeth or dentine sensitivity. This condition is common when the enamel covering the crown of the tooth is worn away and the root surfaces of teeth are exposed.

Severe Pain

Any injury to the gums or teeth can be very painful. In some cases, however, the cause of severe dental pain is not obvious. For example, pain that comes on suddenly may be caused by particles of food that got lodged in a cavity and have started to irritate the nerve inside the tooth. If you lose a filling or a crown, the nerve inside the tooth may be exposed, and you may feel severe pain when air or hot or cold substances touch the uncovered part of the tooth.

Should You Have Your Wisdom Teeth Removed?

A few people are born without wisdom teeth or have room in their mouths for them, but like Jen and her brother, many of us get our wisdom teeth taken out during our college years. And like Patrick, many of us are first alerted to the problem when our wisdom teeth don't emerge (erupt) into the mouth properly because there is not enough toom for them to fit.

Sialedenitus

The salivary glands contain a network of ducts through which saliva flows into the mouth. If the flow of saliva is reduced or stopped for some reason, it can cause a bacterial infection called sialadenitis (sigh-a-lah-den-EYE-tis). Sialadenitis is most common in the parotid gland (in front of your ear) and the submandibular gland (under your chin) and is usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus germs.

Smart Snacks For Healthy Teeth

Sugary snacks taste so good – but they aren't so good for your teeth or your body. The candies, cakes, cookies and other sugary foods that kids love to eat between meals can cause tooth decay. Some surgary foods have a lot of fat in them, too. Kids who consume sugary snacks eat many different kinds of sugar every day, including table sugar (sucrose) and corn sweeteners (fructose). Starchy snacks can also break down into sugars once they're in your mouth.

Soda Or Pop? It's Teeth Trouble By Any Name

Soft drinks have emerged as one of the most significant dietary sources of tooth decay, affecting people of all ages. Acids and acidic sugar byproducts in soft drinks soften tooth enamel, contributing to the formation of cavities. In extreme cases, softer enamel combined with improper brushing, grinding of the teeth or other conditions can lead to tooth loss.

Soft Tissue Injuries

The soft tissues in the mouth are delicate and sensitive, and when they are injured, it can be very painful. Soft tissues, which include the tongue, cheeks, gums and lips, can be injured when you accidentally bite down on them, if you fall, are in an accident, or if you put food in your mouth that is too hot. Chewing on hard objects also can damage soft tissues.

Sports Mouth Guards

Sports guards, mouth guards and mouth protectors are different names for the same thing: a device worn over your teeth that protects them from direct blows. Mouth guards are an important piece of athletic equipment for anyone participating in a sport that involves falls, body contact or flying equipment. This includes football, rugby, cricket, basketball, hockey, skateboarding, gymnastics, mountain biking — any activity that might result in an injury to the mouth.

Taking Care Of Your Teeth

Thanks to better at-home care and in-office dental treatments, more people than ever before are keeping their teeth throughout their lives. Although some diseases and conditions can make dental disease and tooth loss more likely, most of us have a good deal of control over whether we keep our teeth into old age.

Tartar

What is tartar? Tartar, sometimes called calculus, is plaque that has hardened on your teeth. Tartar can also form at and underneath the gumline and can irritate gum tissues. Tartar gives plaque more surface area on which to grow and a much stickier surface to adhere to, which can lead to more serious conditions, such as cavities and gum disease.

Temporomandibular Disorders

You may have read articles in newspapers and magazines about "TMD" ? temporomandibular (jaw) disorders, also called "TMJ syndrome." Perhaps you have even felt pain sometimes in your jaw area, or maybe your dentist or physician has told you that you have TMD.

Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs)

Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) describe several problems that affect your temporomandibular joint (TMJ), or jaw joint, and the muscles of the face that help you to chew. If you place your fingers just in front of your ears and open your mouth, the movement you feel is your TMJ. It is a small ball-and-socket joint consisting of the ball, called the condyle; the socket, called the glenoid fossa; and a small, fibrous disk, which acts as a shock absorber between the ball and socket.

The Facts about Mouth Guards

Know the differences between the four major types of mouth guards and learn which is best for your needs.

Thrush (Candidiasis)

Thrush is the common name for a mouth infection caused by an overgrowth of the Candida fungus, which normally lives in many people's mouths. It is a surface infection that can affect the corners of the mouth, the insides of the cheeks, the tongue, palate and throat. Thrush is a common infection in babies. A newborn may acquire the Candida fungus during delivery, if its mother had an active vaginal yeast infection. Symptoms of thrush usually follow within 7 to 10 days after birth.

Too Much Drilling? Not All Early Tooth Decay Needs A Filling

To find tooth decay early, some dentists are using newer technologies, in addition to visual exams and X-rays. The devices claim to be able to detect the beginnings of decay, when the tooth begins to soften, before it turns into a cavity.

Tooth Anatomy

What Are the Different Parts of a Tooth?

Tooth Discoloration

Your teeth can become discolored by stains on the surface or by changes in the tooth material.

Tooth Sensitivity – General

Tooth sensitivity is something that affects a number of people. It is often caused by eating or drinking something hot, cold, sweet or acidic. Under normal conditions, the underlying dentin of the tooth (the layer that immediately surrounds the nerve) is covered by the enamel in the tooth crown, and the gums that surround the tooth. Over time, the enamel covering can get thinner, thus providing less protection. The gums can also recede over time, exposing the underlying root surface dentin.

Toothbrush Care And Replacement

o keep your toothbrush and yourself healthy, make sure you let it dry out between uses. Toothbrushes can be breeding grounds for germs, fungus and bacteria, which after a while can build up to significant levels. After using your toothbrush, shake it vigorously under tap water and store it in an upright position so that it can air out.

Toothpastes, Toothbrushes And More

So many toothpastes are on the market today, choosing one can be confusing. When buying toothpaste for your child, look for one that contains fluoride and tastes good. Some toothpastes also are approved by the American Dental Association (ADA). The ADA Seal of Acceptance means that the manufacturer has provided data proving that the toothpaste is safe and effective. Some manufacturers choose not to seek the ADA seal of approval. So, toothpastes without the ADA seal also may be safe and work well, but their performance has not been evaluated by the ADA.

Treatment Of Temporomandibular Disorder

Just as there are no established guidelines for diagnosing temporomandibular disorder, there also is no single best treatment. Most experts agree, however, that conservative, nonsurgical therapy is the right way to begin. Surgery and other invasive treatments, such as injections, can create more problems and are best left as a last resort.

Treatment Options for Tooth Sensitivity

While tooth sensitivity is one of the most common dental problems, not everyone requires the same treatment. Your treatment will change depending on the cause. Fortunately most all types of sensitivity are treatable, sometimes right from your home.

What Are Wisdom Teeth?

Wisdom teeth are the last molars on each side of the jaws. They are also the last teeth to emerge, or erupt, usually when a person is between 16 and 20.

What Causes Tooth Sensitivity?

Tooth sensitivity is something that affects a number of people. It is often caused by eating or drinking something hot, cold, sweet or acidic. Under normal conditions, the underlying dentin of the tooth (the layer that immediately surrounds the nerve) is covered by the enamel in the tooth crown, and the gums that surround the tooth. Over time, the enamel covering can get thinner, thus providing less protection. The gums can also recede over time, exposing the underlying root surface dentin.

What Is Biofilm?

You may not be familiar with the term biofilm, but it is something that you come into contact with every day. The plaque that forms on your teeth and causes tooth decay and periodontal disease is a type of biofilm. Clogged drains also are caused by biofilm, and you may have encountered biofilm-coated rocks when walking into a river or stream.

What Is Gingivitis?

Periodontal disease, a disorder involving bacterial infection of the gums, is very prevalent in the United States today. It is estimated that 35.7 million Americans are living with the disease.1 It is present when inflammation and infection destroy the tissues that support the teeth, including the gums, the periodontal ligaments, and the tooth sockets. Gingivitis, the mildest form of periodontal disease, is an inflammatory process confined to the gums. It is caused by a nonspecific, long-term accumulation of plaque on the teeth and is usually reversible. Plaque-induced gingivitis is the most common form of the disease.

What Is Gingivitis? Signs and Symptoms

Gingivitis—an inflammation of the gums—is the initial stage of gum disease and the easiest to treat. The direct cause of gingivitis is plaque - the soft, sticky, colorless film of bacteria that forms constantly on the teeth and gums.

What Is Periodontal Disease?

If your hands bled when you washed them, you would be concerned. Yet, many people think it's normal if their gums bleed when they brush or floss. In a 1999 study, researchers at the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) found that half of Americans over 30 had bleeding gums.

What Is Tartar?

Tartar, sometimes called calculus, is plaque that has hardened on your teeth. Tartar can also form at and underneath the gumline and can irritate gum tissues. Tartar gives plaque more surface area on which to grow and a much stickier surface to adhere, which can lead to more serious conditions, such as cavities and gum disease.

What Is Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMJ)?

TMJ, or temporomandibular joint disorder, means that the hinge connecting the upper and lower jaw isn't working properly. This hinge is one of the most complex joints in the body, responsible for moving the lower jaw forward, backward and side-to-side. Any problem that prevents this complex system of muscles, ligaments, discs and bones from working as it should is called TMJ. Often, TMJ feels like your jaw is popping or clicking or even "getting stuck" for a moment. The exact cause of this misalignment is often impossible to determine.

What are Canker and Mouth Sores?

Mouth irritations and oral lesions are swellings, spots or sores on your mouth, lips or tongue. Although there are numerous types of mouth sores and disorders, among the most common are Aphthous ulcers, cold sores, leukoplakia and candidiasis (thrush). These are discussed below. If you have a mouth sore, you're not alone — around one third of all people are affected at some point. Nonetheless, mouth sores, irritations and lesions can be painful, unsightly and can interfere with eating and speaking. Any mouth sore that persists for a week or more should be examined by your dentist. A biopsy (tissue taken for testing) may be advised and can usually determine the cause, ruling out such serious diseases as cancer and HIV.

What are Cavities?

"Cavities" is another way of saying tooth decay. Tooth decay is heavily influenced by lifestyle — what we eat, how well we take care of our teeth, the presence of fluoride in our water and toothpaste. Heredity also plays a role in how susceptible your teeth may be to decay.

What are Dental Crowns and Tooth Bridges?

Both crowns and most bridges are fixed prosthetic devices. Unlike removable devices such as dentures, which you can take out and clean daily, crowns and bridges are cemented onto existing teeth or implants, and can only be removed by a dentist.

What are Sports Mouth Guards?

Sports guards, mouth guards and mouth protectors are different names for the same thing: a device worn over your teeth that protects them from blows to the face and head. Mouth guards are an important piece of athletic equipment for anyone participating in a sport that involves falls, body contact or flying equipment. This includes football, basketball, baseball, soccer, hockey, skateboarding, gymnastics, mountain biking ? any activity that might result in an injury to the mouth.

What are Wisdom Teeth?

Wisdom teeth are the last molars on each side of the jaws. They are the last teeth to emerge, or erupt, usually when a person is between 16 and 20.

What are the Stages of Gum Disease?

Gum disease is an inflammation of the gums that can progress to affect the bone that surrounds and supports your teeth. It is caused by the bacteria in plaque, a sticky, colourless film that constantly forms on your teeth.

What is Dry Mouth?

Dry mouth means you don't have enough saliva, or spit, to keep your mouth moist. Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while, especially if you're nervous, upset or under stress. But if you have a dry mouth all or most of the time, it can be uncomfortable and can lead to more serious health problems or indicate that a more serious medical condition may exist. That's because saliva does more than just keep the mouth wet — it helps digest food, protects teeth from decay, prevents infection by controlling bacteria in the mouth, and makes it possible for you to chew and swallow.

What is Good Oral Hygiene?

Good oral hygiene results in a mouth that looks and smells healthy. This means your teeth are clean and free of debris, gums are firmly held against teeth and do not hurt or bleed when you brush or floss, and bad breath is not a constant problem.

What is Gum Disease?

More than 75 percent of Americans over 35 have some form of gum disease. In its earliest stage, your gums might swell and bleed easily. At its worst, you might lose your teeth. The bottom line? If you want to keep your teeth, you must take care of your gums.

What is Plaque?

Plaque is a sticky, colorless film of bacteria and sugars that constantly forms on our teeth. It is the main cause of cavities and gum disease, and can harden into tartar if not removed daily.

What is Tooth Sensitivity?

Tooth sensitivity is a common name for dentin hypersensitivity or root sensitivity. If hot, cold, sweet or very acidic foods and drinks, or breathing in cold air, makes your teeth or a tooth sensitive or painful then you have sensitive teeth.

Why Your Child May Need a Space Maintainer

Early tooth loss may require a space maintainer which allows the permanent tooth to grow in properly.

Wisdom Teeth

Teeth are impacted when they fail to emerge through the gums, or emerge only partially, at the expected time.

Oral Health Focus

An Overview of the Oral Health and Systemic Health Association.
A growing body of evidence suggests that the maintenance of healthy teeth and gums is important not only to the overall health of the mouth, but may be integral to the overall health of the body. Read more.
 
Colgate Total 12 Toothpaste Video

Colgate Total 12 Toothpaste Video